CONDITIONAL SENTENCE part 2

1. Conditional Sentence Type 1
The if-clause is in the present tense, the main clause uses will and the infinitive, or simple present.

When do we use conditional sentence type 1?
a. We use conditional sentence type 1 to talk about possible situations in the present or future.
o If you leave earlier, you will not be late.
o If you open the windows, the room will get some fresh air.
b. We often use conditional type 1 to talk about facts or processes:
o If you heat water to 100 degrees, it will boil.
o If we stare into the sun, we will hurt our eyes.
Note:
Other modal verbs can also be used in place of will and would.
o If it rains like this all day, the river might flood. (might = will possibly)
o If it rains like this all day, the river could flood. (could = will be able to)

2. Conditional Sentence Type 2
The if-clause is in the simple past or the past continuous tense, the main clause uses would and the infinitive, or would be and the present participle (Verb-ing)

When do we use conditional sentence type 2?
Conditional sentence type 2 is used to talk about actions or situations that are not taking place in the present or future, but we can imagine the probable result.
• If we didn’t live in a big city, we would not have to breathe polluted air everyday. (In truth, we live in a big city)
• If he were here, I would tell him about my plan. (In fact, he isn’t here)
Note:
• ‘Were’ is used for both singular and plural subjects.
• The use of type 2 conditional in “If I were you, I would ………” is a common form of advice.

3. Conditional Sentence Type 3
The if-clause is in the past perfect or the past perfect continuous tense, the main clause uses would have and past participle (Verb 3), or would have been and present participle (Verb-ing).

When do we use conditional sentence type 3?
Conditional sentence type 3 is used to talk about actions or situations that did not take or were not taking place in the past, but we can imagine the probable result.
• If you had come to the party last night, you would have met my cousin. (In truth, you didn’t come to the party last night)
• If he had not been late this morning, his teacher would not have punished him. (In truth, he was late)

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